lyriumdealer:

a trans woman’s beauty is not determined by how well she can adhere to cis-centric standards of beauty

a non-white woman’s beauty is not determined by how well she can adhere to euro-centric beauty standards

(via whipping-girl)

whipping-girl:

applestatic this is us

unpopuler:

food will never break my heart

(via lumosic)

ebunnies:

my friends little brother lays it down

ebunnies:

my friends little brother lays it down

(Source: ebuddies, via jawn-i-made-coffee)

msdanconia asked: SLYTHERIN or HUFFLPUFF
Or perhaps in Slytherin. You’ll make your real friends, those cunning folk use any means to achieve their ends.” 
(locket credit: chipmunkgiggle)

(Source: frankdoyles, via spookynatasharomanova)

elisemerand:

#ILLUSTRATION - A portrait of Hayao Miyasaki designed with his graphic world by Sát Thủ Cá Basa
A portrait with many details, all from the world of feature films of this great artist l Via

Some Little Things i Like : Tumblr l Facebook l Twitter

(via mundosdepapel)

ladylucyloo:

severely-awesome:

Anti-Friendzone Makeup Tutorial

literally the most beautiful thing that ive ever watched

(via whipping-girl)

socimages:

Breasts, chests, and double standards.
Found at A Whole Lot of Something.

socimages:

Breasts, chests, and double standards.

Found at A Whole Lot of Something.

socimages:

Boys will be boys and moms will get used to it.

The card above is a great example of the social construction of boys as naughty. Boys break rules, boys don’t do what they’re told…and even though they may get in trouble for this, boys also often get the message that parents also find it somewhat cute, or at least to be expected — boys will be boys, after all. Acting up sometimes is just what they do, and it’s a sign of their boyish spirit.

It’s hard to imagine a similar card designed to be from a girl. We don’t have similar beliefs that “girls will be girls,” and that you just have to expect that they’ll misbehave sometimes.

It’s not that parents don’t know that girls fail to do what they’re told. But it doesn’t fit into cultural notions that girls just can’t help it, or that we should find it somewhat endearing even when we’re frustrated by their behavior. So when girls misbehave, adults generally interpret it as an individual choice on their part, rather than due to their sex (and, thus, not entirely under their control).

Gwen Sharp is an associate professor of sociology at Nevada State College. You can follow her on Twitter at @gwensharpnv.

socimages:

Dead! Executions and the power of photography.
In 1928 readers of the New York Daily News were shocked by this cover.  It was the first photograph ever taken of an electrocution. The executed is a woman named Ruth Snyder, convicted of murdering her husband.  The photographer was a journalist named Tom Howard.  Cameras were not allowed in the execution room, but Howard snuck a device in under his pant leg.  Prison officials weren’t  happy, but the paper was overjoyed.
The fact that the image was placed on the front page with the aggressive headline “DEAD!” suggests that editors expected the photograph to have an impact.  Summarizing at Time, Erica Fahr Campbell writes:

The black-and-white image was shocking to the U.S. and international public alike. There sat a 32-year-old wife and mother, killed for killing. Her blurred figured seemed to evoke her struggle, as one can imagine her last, strained breaths. Never before had the press been able to attain such a startling image—one not made in a faraway war, one not taken of the aftermath of a crime scene, but one capturing the very moment between life and death here at home.

It is one thing to know that executions are happening and another to see it, if mediated, with one’s own eyes.
Pictures can powerfully alter the dynamics of political debates.  Lennart Nilsson‘s famous series of photographs of fetuses, for example, humanized and romanticized the unborn.  They also erased pregnant women, making it easier to think of the fetus as an independent entity. A life, even.
Unfortunately, Campbell’s article doesn’t delve any further into the effect of this photograph on death penalty debates.  To this day, however, no prisons allow photography during executions.  What if things were different?  How might the careful documentation of this process — with all our technology for capturing and sharing images — change the debate today?  And whose interests are most protected by keeping executions invisible?
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

Dead! Executions and the power of photography.

In 1928 readers of the New York Daily News were shocked by this cover.  It was the first photograph ever taken of an electrocution. The executed is a woman named Ruth Snyder, convicted of murdering her husband.  The photographer was a journalist named Tom Howard.  Cameras were not allowed in the execution room, but Howard snuck a device in under his pant leg.  Prison officials weren’t  happy, but the paper was overjoyed.

The fact that the image was placed on the front page with the aggressive headline “DEAD!” suggests that editors expected the photograph to have an impact.  Summarizing at Time, Erica Fahr Campbell writes:

The black-and-white image was shocking to the U.S. and international public alike. There sat a 32-year-old wife and mother, killed for killing. Her blurred figured seemed to evoke her struggle, as one can imagine her last, strained breaths. Never before had the press been able to attain such a startling image—one not made in a faraway war, one not taken of the aftermath of a crime scene, but one capturing the very moment between life and death here at home.

It is one thing to know that executions are happening and another to see it, if mediated, with one’s own eyes.

Pictures can powerfully alter the dynamics of political debates.  Lennart Nilsson‘s famous series of photographs of fetuses, for example, humanized and romanticized the unborn.  They also erased pregnant women, making it easier to think of the fetus as an independent entity. A life, even.

Unfortunately, Campbell’s article doesn’t delve any further into the effect of this photograph on death penalty debates.  To this day, however, no prisons allow photography during executions.  What if things were different?  How might the careful documentation of this process — with all our technology for capturing and sharing images — change the debate today?  And whose interests are most protected by keeping executions invisible?

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

The sexual politics of veganism.

Carol Adams has written extensively on the sexual politics of meat, arguing that women and other animals are both sexualized and commodified to facilitate their consumption (both figuratively and literally) by those in power. One result has been the feminization of veganism and vegetarianism. This has the effect of delegitimizing, devaluing, and defanging veganism as a social movement.

This process works within the vegan movement as well, with an open embracing of veganism as inherently feminized and sexualized. This works to undermine a movement (that is comprised mostly of women) and repackage it for a patriarchal society. Instead of strong, political collective of women, we have yet another demographic of sexually available individual women who exist for male consumption.

Take a browse through vegan cookbooks on Amazon, for instance, and the theme of “sexy veganism” that emerges is unmistakable.  Oftentimes, veganism is presented as a means of achieving idealized body types.  These books are mostly geared to a female audience, as society values women primarily as sexual resources for men and women have internalized these gender norms.  Many of these books bank on the power of thin privilege, sizism, and stereotypes about female competition for male attention to shame women into purchasing.

To reach a male audience, authors have to draw on a notion of “authentic masculinity” to make a highly feminized concept palatable to a patriarchal society where all that is feminine is scorned.  Some have referred to this trend as “heganism.”  The idea is to protect male superiority by unnecessarily gendering veganism into veganism for girls and veganism for boys.  For the boys, we have to appeal to “real” manhood.

Then there is the popular tactic of turning women into consumable objects in the exact same way that meat industries do.  Animal rights groups recruit “lettuce ladies” or “cabbage chicks” dressed as vegetables to interact with the public.  PETA routinely has nude women pose in and among vegetables to convey the idea that women are sexy food.  Vegan pinup sites and strip joints also feed into this notion.  Essentially, it is the co-optation and erosion of a women’s movement.  Instead of empowering women on behalf of animals, these approaches disempower women on behalf of men.

In sum, vegan feminism argues that women and non-human animals are commodified and sexualized objects offered up for the pleasurable consumption of those in power. In this way, both women and other animals are oppressed under capitalist patriarchy. When the vegan movement sexualizes and feminizes vegan food, or replicates the woman-as-food trope, it fails to acknowledge this important connection and ultimately serves to repackage potentially threatening feminist collective action in a way that is palatable to patriarchy.

Corey Lee Wrenn is a Council Member for the American Sociological Association’s Animals & Society section.  This section facilitates improved sociological inquiry into issues concerning nonhuman animals and is currently seeking members. Membership is $5-$10; you must be a member of the ASA to join.

Cross-posted at the Vegan Feminist Network.

tipchune:

nagisa-you-little-shit:

jotarukujo:

YOU’RE ALL FUCKING WEEABOOS AREN’T YOU. EVERYONE REBLOGGING THIS IS AN ANIME FAN AREN’T THEY. THIRSTING AFTER ANIMATED DICK. GO TO CHURCH

Watashiwa came out to have a sugoi time and I’m honestly feeling so attacked right now


tarenel whipping-girl applestatic

tipchune:

nagisa-you-little-shit:

jotarukujo:

YOU’RE ALL FUCKING WEEABOOS AREN’T YOU. EVERYONE REBLOGGING THIS IS AN ANIME FAN AREN’T THEY. THIRSTING AFTER ANIMATED DICK. GO TO CHURCH

Watashiwa came out to have a sugoi time and I’m honestly feeling so attacked right now

tarenel whipping-girl applestatic

(Source: jotarukujo)

tarenel:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

shootingstarsafterdark:

ChaosLife - Homo Hint

With comments too great not to include. You should check the heck out of that webcomic series either way 8D

The comments on this are every bit as fabulous as the actual comic :D

This is how I pictured applestatic as a young maiden.